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True StoryHow The 'God Save The Queen'-boycot Made The Sex Pistol Song A Big Hit

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In 1977, Queen Elizabeth II had been ruling for exactly 25 years. Festivities were held all over the UK, but there were also people who didn’t agree with the monarchy. Amongst them was a young band from London called The Sex Pistols.

The Sex Pistols didn’t agree with the way the Queen (mis)treated the working class. They turned their criticism into a song:  ‘God Save The Queen’. Of course, the UK royals didn’t like this. That is why they exerted pressure to the BBC and had the song banned from all broadcasts. 

Little did they know that it would only stimulate sales. Because of the extra publicity, the song reached second place in the British charts. However, many believe that the lists were manipulated to ensure the song would never reach number one. 


To make their statement clearer, they tried to play the song from a boat on the Thames right in front of Westminster Abbey during a big celebration of the Queen’s silver jubilee. But before they could even play the first notes, they were stopped by the police and their boat was towed away. 

However, that is not the only remarkable thing about this song. When the first vinyls were pressed, the band was still signed with the A&M label. A few weeks later they left that label, which is why only a couple of copies of the record were made. This makes those few vinyls one of the most wanted records on the market. So make sure that you check your record collection tonight, because if you happen to own one of these rare records, it could make you 15,000 euros richer ;).

True Story

In ‘True Story’ we present you with an interesting music fact. Fascinating details about an artist, a song or a whole genre: it can be anything. We provide you with a story you can tell your mates or even your co-workers by the coffee machine. Stuff to talk about!